Electro Fash

Now the gadgets themselves are the centerpiece of our style, reflecting our lust for portable electronics.
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A while back, gadgets got their own accessories. Cell phones sparkled with charms, iPods donned more chic cover-ups than Barbie, and Sidekicks got bedazzled. It was cute (it was about cute), but it’s starting to look old. The late aughts are doing something a little different. Now the gadgets themselves are the centerpiece of our style, reflecting our lust for portable electronics. Whereas in 2006 doodads hung off your cell, in the new year it will be the cell that swings naked from a chain designed just for showing it off, like the Khush “Nazar” necklace, which comes in three styles ($115–$288 at Diavolina, L.A., 310-550-1341). Your PlayStation obsession can be publicized anytime, anywhere, with a pavé diamond pendant (right) by Jason of Beverly Hills ($15,000, 310-777-7551, by appointment only). Even the mp3 player has been one-upped. Babies—now there’s an accessory—can be turned into virtual iPods when clad in Elsa Kawai onesies, illustrated with the click-wheel graphic ($23 at A+R, Silver Lake, 323-913-9558).

 

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Denim Countdown
Denim companies, hoping to replicate the success of women’s designer jeans, are flooding stores with premium dungarees for men. Each brand features its own decorative wash or stitching, but standing out in the crowd may require simply naming the product with a number. 7 for All Mankind is one of the top men’s jeans lines at Nordstrom, Neiman Marcus, and Saks Fifth Avenue ($132–$209). At Lisa Kline Men, 575 is the must-have brand ($225–$275); at Kitson Men and Fred Segal Fun, 1921 is the magic number ($160–$190). Of course, designer jeans represent a small percentage of the denim worn by Angelenos. None of the above can compare to Levi’s 501s, the granddaddy that outsells them all at California Surplus Mart ($40–$43).

Bottom photograph by Maryellen Baker