The Britely Has Jazz-Age Vibes—and Wolfgang Puck

L.A.’s newest private club arrives just in time for a Roaring Twenties redux
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The last thing L.A. needs is another private club—unless it’s The Britely. Bringing a fresh reboot of Old Hollywood glamour to the hotel-heavy Sunset Strip, the club, on the site of the old House of Blues, is a palatial, art deco pastiche of velvet sofas; ostrich feathers; prismatic chandeliers; smoky mirrors; floral, animal, and geometric prints in pinks, pistachios, and butter yellows. It’s an an homage to the Jazz Age—a place the ghost of Jay Gatsby would be happy to haunt. There are two indoor bars and one outdoor, with sconces and chandeliers throwing the kind of light you want to get a little louche under. And how many Hollywood social clubs serve up Wolfgang Puck’s luxe-level cuisine in two restaurants? Membership is $2,800 a year or $4,200 for couples. That includes entrée to the splashy gym and spa at The Britely’s sister hotel, the Pendry. When that long-promised Roaring Twenties redux finally rolls in, the Britely will be ready. Are you?


Pretty Palette

the britely

Wayne Nathan

All of interior designer Martin Brudnizki’s favorite hues show up in this painting by Markus Linnenbrink. “There aren’t many cities that offer such a vivid and iconic palette,” Brudnizki says. “Ocean blue, greens of hills, and sunset pinks became the foundation for the scheme. The Britely was designed with the city of West Hollywood in mind; its identity is unique to the area.”

Raising the Bar

the britely

Wayne Nathan

Wolfgang Puck’s cheery Merois restaurant, which just opened next to the rooftop pool, hopes to do for seafood what Puck’s Chinois on Main did for Asian cuisine. And If you come early enough, you might catch Puck himself reviewing the night’s menu from his usual poolside perch.

Main Event

Wayne Nathan

The lounge features a deco-style warm-pink wall: “We call it Prada pink,” says managing director Estelle Lacroix, differentiating it from the millenial hue. Boldly striped barstools contrast with a tile floor and a marble-topped bar. “We tried to add some whimsy to the relaxed ambience of the club,” says Brudnizki. “We want people to come and escape daily life.”

Feeling Blue

Wayne Nathan

Plush teal sofas add a bit of gravitas to the caprice of a ballet-pink ostrich-feather lamp and a painting by local artist Erin Garcia in “the bowling alley room.”  When you’re not bowling strikes, you can take in performances by visiting musical acts.

Strike a Pose

the britely

Wayne Nathan

You can’t help but shine while making a dramatic entrance on this swank, mirrored staircase leading past a painting by Kenton Parker and down to the club’s main rooms. You’ll see yourself coming and going—as will everyone else.


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