Right-Wing Youth Group Launches a Pop-Culture Show ‘Without the Leftist Propaganda’

POPlitics is Turning Point USA’s answer to shows like Extra, and it’s definitely extra
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Turning Point USA, the Conservative non-profit organization that purports to have a presence at more than 1,500 U.S. college campuses and calls itself “grassroots”—though it’s led by 26-year-old Trump family pal Charlie Kirk and is reportedly funded by anonymous billionaires—has a new gossip show in the style of Entertainment Tonight and Extra. Called POPlitics, the Instagram-based webseries has the slogan “Pop Culture Without the Propaganda.” As the Outline puts it, “the result is as propaganda-free as anything else under the Turning Point USA umbrella.”

First, a little more about TPUSA:

But surely a show focusing on the likes of Cardi B. and Lady Gaga hosted by plucky former Kentucky radio DJ Alex Clark can’t be too problematic…right?

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In the premiere episode, Clark—wearing the factory-distressed jeans that have become her signature uniform—welcomes viewers to the “first-ever daily conservative pop-culture show that gives you the latest pop culture news without the leftist propaganda.”

In the next breath, she introduces a segment on celebrity Halloween costumes, noting, “The stars were out in Hollywood doing what they do best—pretending to be someone they’re not.”

The producers of the show certainly know what memes hit home with the kids these days. In a Thanksgiving post, Clark said “sad, chaotic little” comedian Pete Davidson is more fragile than the leg lamp in A Christmas Story because he reportedly made audience members sign an NDA at a recent show to prevent his working material from being leaked.

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“Exactly what kind of Orwellian utopia is this?” she demanded. “This is the same guy who got a Hillary Clinton tattoo and is a very vocal leftist, so surprise, surprise. The same people who want more government also want to control your thoughts.”

Assuring the audience that she writes her own scripts every day on the December 4 episode, and noting that she knows her fans—all 9,800 of them—“like my holy jeans,” Clark announces that the Hallmark Channel is “under attack” over a lack of diversity in its Christmas movies. After declaring a Hollywood Reporter story on the subject “boring” and “unoriginal,” Clark takes an opportunity to remind viewers what the Holiday Season is all about:

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“The whole reason we started celebrating Christmas in the first place was because of the birth of Jesus Christ. Hello? Christ-mas? It’s in the name!”

She goes on: “Has a large part of Christmas become more secular? Yes,” Clark admits, perhaps referring to the 1843 publication of A Christmas Carol. “But I would say it’s a smaller, minority group of people who celebrate the holiday without any aspect of Christianity whatsoever […] It really seems like to me there is a subtle, sneaky effort to erase Christian values from absolutely everything.”

On last Wednesday’s episode, she launched into a rant about an Atlantic article about whether women can wear leggings to work because, as author Olga Khazan wrote, “Women already have to deal with a persistent pay gap, gendered stereotypes about our personalities, and expectations to apply an assortment of powders to our faces every morning. At least give us stretchy pants to endure it all in.”

“I mean, it is exhausting, doing all those mental gymnastics just to convince yourself that something exists when it actually doesn’t,” Clark reasons. “If the argument is ‘I’m stressed and overworked so you have to let me be comfy,’ you’d also have to let men work in sweatpants.”

If you can’t get enough of this hard-hitting, truth-to-power commentary, Clark and Turning Point also have a Facebook page, CUTEservatives. Current membership: around 1k.


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