NATAS CEO on Still Hosting Daytime Emmys Hours After Roe V Wade Was Overturned

“Daytime has been where we have confronted these challenging issues of the day and I expect we will continue to confront them now,” CEO tells LAMag
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National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS) CEO Adam Sharp decided to continue moving forward with Friday’s Daytime Emmys because the shows representing the space has always “confronted these challenging issues of the day” and he doesn’t envision that changing now.  

“Daytime has been at the forefront of tackling major social issues for decades. The first abortion storyline to appear on American television was on a daytime drama 10 years before Roe V. Wade,” Sharp told Los Angeles. 

“Daytime was the first time gay marriage was addressed on television, the first time teen pregnancy was addressed on television consistently, daytime has been where we have confronted these challenging issues of the day and I expect we will continue to confront them now,” he added. 

Shortly after the red carpet, Sharp took the stage before the live telecast begun on CBS to share that while he would normally tell everyone to keep their speeches short, “tonight is not a normal night.” 

“There is a lot to say tonight. It’s a tough news day,” Sharp told the crowd. “We have no doubt that the daytime community will use its collective voice to tackle these issues at all, just as it has been at the forefront of so many societal debates over the last few decades. Daytime has always been first.” 

A first for the Daytime Emmys this year, Mishael Morgan of The Young And The Restless, became the very first black woman to win Outstanding Lead Actress. An accomplishment Sharp calls “progress.” 

“I think it shows the progress we’re making in awards competitions across the board. It shows the progress that the shows are making, but clearly there’s a long road left to go,” Sharp said. “It was exciting to see.” 


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