Sex-Trafficker Ghislaine Maxwell Lands Low-Security Prison Digs

Maxwell’s latest penal accommodations are the ultimate in federal convict clout—with yoga, Pilates and movie nights all on offer
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Considering the fact that convicted sex-trafficker of underage girls Ghislaine Maxwell, 60, complained at sentencing about her “harsh incarceration,” it will come as good news as she disappears more deeply into her 20-year federal prison journey that she will be accommodated at one of the government’s more agreeable destinations.

Jefferey Epstein’s former girlfriend and accomplice will be returning to Florida—the scene of some of her crimes—for her newest federal prison digs at FCI Tallahassee, a low-security facility with a laundry list of therapeutic activities, just 360 miles from a mansion where she partnered and plotted with the late child rapist.

Maxwell was moved on Friday, according to ABC News. Her attorneys had requested that she serve her time in Danbury, Connecticut, a 3.5-hour drive from the rural Bradford, N.H. hideaway where she was finally captured in July, 2020. Her new home currently holds roughly 820 male and female inmates. According to an inmate handbook, those at the facility have access to an array of activities, including painting, leather, art and ceramics, musical instruments, team sports, yoga, Pilates, movie nights, and an inmate talent show.

However, many contend the Florida detention center isn’t exactly The Breakfast Club, either.

“There is nothing cushy about Maxwell’s designation. She is going to be surrounded by barbed wire and fences. Her new facility is a far cry from the minimum security camps that people may imagine from television,” Duncan Levin, a former federal prosecutor now in private practice in New York who was not involved in the case, told ABC.

Her previous time was served at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn, where Maxwell and her lawyers complained of interrupted sleep, hundreds of searches, and an instance of physical abuse.


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