L.A.-Based Ad Agency Omelet is Changing the #DroughtShaming Game

The company is launching their H2No campaign today
524
h2nolawnsigns

Photograph courtesy Omelet

Everybody loves to be recognized for a good deed. L.A.-based ad agency Omelet is banking on it with their new H2No campaign, an initiative that seeks to commend Angelenos who are taking real steps to combat the California drought.

The #H2No movement was conceived by Alex Delyle, a senior copywriter at Omelet. “I was walking my dog in my neighborhood one morning and was stepping in puddle after puddle on my block,” she says. “I sat down at my computer and started writing this note that I was going to leave on my neighbors cars, but I stopped myself—I figured no one will listen if I talk shit about them.” Delyle’s change in heart helped her to think about the problem on a larger scale, and so she brought it to her coworkers. “We’re all great communicators,” she says. “I thought, how can we create something to raise awareness in a positive way and be good neighbors to each other? A week later, we landed on this campaign.”

The gist is this: Angelenos who have made a concerted effort to save water—ignoring the welfare of their lawns, pulling up their gardens and replanting them with drought-friendly flora—can get a sign for their yards that will tell the world of their awesomely conservationist ways (see above). Omelet is also providing one sheets and door signs that can be shared with each house on your block. The company has since teamed up with international landscape architecture practice Mia Lehrer + Associates as well as human rights organization DIGDEEP to help get H2No off of the ground.

As for her hopes for the campaign, “The dream is that there’d be no more drought,” Delyle says. But on a smaller scale, she continues, “we’re hoping to get people to think differently and change their behavior. We’re taking that idea of drought shaming and flipping it by celebrating the people who are doing the right thing.”

To join the H2No movement, visit its Web site.

Facebook Comments