Daily Brief: New Intel Discovered in City Hall Audio Leak Case; Controversial California Housing Law Is a Bust

Also, after 3 men died during LAPD encounters in 24 hours, the City Council wants an “Office of Unarmed Response” to address the public safety crisis
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TODAY’S ESSENTIAL NEWS

» Hate Crimes In L.A. Reach Highest Point Since 1991 According to Professor Brian Levin, the number of hate crimes has been going up. The director of the Center of the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State San Bernardino said Los Angeles Police Department data shows a 13% spike in hate crimes between 2021 and 2022. The bias category with the sharpest increase was in anti-transgender crime at 53%. Anti-Black crime increased by 36% and anti-Jewish crime went up by 24%. Levin believes that politics is one of the driving factors behind the rise. [CBS]

» Officials Warn Of Dangerous Conditions On Mt. Baldy After Two Hikers Die Two hikers, injured in falls, have died on Mt. Baldy in recent weeks. And search and rescue teams have responded to 14 rescues on the 10,068-foot peak and the surrounding area in the past month, officials said Tuesday. British actor Julian Sands is currently missing in the area, authorities confirmed Wednesday. On Sunday, A female hiker died after sliding an estimated 500 to 700 feet down Baldy Bowl’s steep, icy hillside, authorities said. [KTLA]

» Long Beach Offers Landlord Incentives To Help House Homeless One week after the city of Long Beach declared a state of emergency on homelessness, it’s moving forward with a plan to incentivize landlords to help the housing situation. The city wants landlords to accept more renters who rely heavily on federally subsidized Emergency Housing Vouchers to pay the bulk of their rent. The financial incentives directed at landlords from the city’s Housing Authority include direct payments by way of leasing bonuses, security deposits, utility deposits, application fees, and damage repairs. [CBS]

» Rapper Says LASD Deputies Threatened To Shoot Him For Sitting In His Car A Los Angeles-based rapper is filing a $10 million claim against the L.A. County Sheriff’s Department, saying that deputies threatened to shoot him while he sat in his car in a public parking lot on New Year’s Eve. The LASD released body camera footage of the interaction Wednesday. Darral Scott, who goes by the name Feezy Lebron, was sitting in his car in the parking lot off Crenshaw Boulevard in Gardena, when he was approached by LASD deputies. Scott was scrolling through Instagram at the time. In the video, Scott can be heard telling the deputy that he was waiting to meet up with a friend. [FoxLA]

» Los Angeles On-Location Filming Falls In 2022 On-location filming in Los Angeles fell by 2.4% in 2022 compared to the prior year, with feature film and television shoot days down 9.6%, TV pilots plummeting 71.9% and commercial shoot days falling 22.6%, according to the latest report from FilmLA, the city and county film permit office. Last year had been shaping up to be a good one for local filming, but production fell off sharply in the third quarter and again in the fourth, down 19.5% compared to Q4 2021. Even so, on-location shoot days continue to hold steady at not-so-great pre-pandemic levels. [Deadline]

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TOP STORIES FROM L.A. MAG

» City Hall’s New Class Learns Campaigning Has Little In Common With the Job Cityside Column: A new class of elected officials is learning that winning just brings about ‘a second campaign’

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ONE MORE THING

How the Creators of Napa’s Suspension House Defied the Odds

The stunning and surprising Suspension House in Napa, California may look like a mirage, as it’s veiled in mist and emerges from a canyon in the early morning light.

But in reality, it’s a recently completed modern dream home—one that wouldn’t have been possible, were it not for a team of architectural, engineering, and design experts collaborating to overcome some pretty challenging obstacles.

First of all, California no longer allows any new construction within 100 feet of a creek, requiring a necessary setback for anything new being built. And the Suspension House isn’t just close to a creek. It crosses over one.

[FULL STORY]

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