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Author Mary Melton

  • Mary Melton

    Editor-in-Chief

    Melton came to Los Angeles magazine as a senior editor in 2000, became executive editor in 2002, and was named editor-in-chief in 2009. She has overseen the magazine’s theme issues, edited features and service stories, written personality profiles and popular culture pieces, and directed the launch of the magazine’s Web site, LAmag.com. Under her leadership, Los Angeles won two National Magazine Awards in 2011 from the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME)—for General Excellence and Feature Writing—the first in the magazine’s history. Two more ASME nominations followed in 2012. Prior to Los Angeles, Melton was an editor and writer at the Los Angeles Times Magazine, from 1995 until 2000. She began her journalism career as an intern at the L.A. Weekly, where she was later appointed managing editor. A fourth-generation Angeleno and a graduate of Hollywood High School, Melton holds a degree in history from UCLA. Follow her @MaryMeltonLA.

 

Postscript: Julius Shulman

I’d like to tell you about the time that Julius Shulman made me pancakes. It was just about a year ago. Los Angeles’s most famous photographer, who at the time was 97 years old, had invited me over on a Monday morning for breakfast at his house. I pulled up the long driveway and knocked at the screen door. No answer. I opened it. “Julius? Are you here?” “In the kitchen,” came his voice, more gentle than usual. I walked in, down the entryway lined with his most iconic images of Los Angeles architecture, to find him standing at the stove, balancing on his walker with one hand and wielding a spatula with the other. He gestured for me to sit down at the lemon yellow Formica kitchen table, beneath a wall filled with a huge snapshot mosaic of his family and friends. He moved the pad of butter around the skillet to allow it to melt, then joined me in the banquette. “I want to ask you about something,” he said deliberately, taking a pause. “When did you become conscious of what you were doing?” Read more...

Julius Shulman: Resources

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