Hyperloop From Los Angeles To San Francisco In 30 Minutes

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UCLA is sponsoring the first public look at the Hyperloop, Elon Musk’s high speed supertube between Los Angeles and San Francisco, at their new IDEAS campus in Playa Del Rey next week. The location is perfect for an exploration of the futuristic technology. The facility is located at the old Howard Hughes aircraft plant on Jefferson Boulevard, renamed the Hercules Campus and owned by Los Angeles magazine’s landlord the Ratkovich Company. The eleven buildings of Hughes Aircraft once housed the flying boat Spruce Goose, the largest helicopter ever built, the XF-11 experimental aircraft, and later the first laser, first air-to-air missile, and the first geosynchronous communications satellite. Science! They also invented XM Radio and DirecTV under that roof, crazy! What a perfect place to learn about Musk’s idea for pressurized capsules that would travel at twice the speed of a jet in a metal tube alongside the 5 freeway… L.A. to San Francisco in 30 minutes.  Sign me up!

 

IDEAS LECTURE: HYPERLOOP: TRANSFORMING TRANSPORTATION

Wednesday, January 15, 2014
6:45pm Reception / 7:30pm Program Begins

IDEAS Campus, 5865 S. Campus Center Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90094

Lectures are free and open to the public. Seating is available on a first-come first-served basis.

No reservations are required.
Information: 310.267.4704

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Comments

  1. Hoot Hoot

    January 9, 2014 at 11:53 pm

    Great idea but how about something to help get across Los Angeles in 30 minutes. Now that would be something.

  2. Sean meaney

    January 10, 2014 at 1:21 am

    We can fully fund a US hyperloop network as a free service with an annual lottery over the next twenty years. Two billion tickets a year at five hundred dollars each, the annual funds dividing into two hundred and fifty billion in tax, fifty billion in lottery management fees, three hundred billion in prizes (Specifically one times one hundred billion, ten times ten billion, and one hundred times one billion). This leaves four hundred billion a year (three hundred billion per seven hundred and fifty miles of hyperloop and one hundred billion per year- the interest on which is sufficient to manage the hyperloop as a free public service).

    1. Johnny

      January 11, 2014 at 8:06 pm

      Sean, you lost me at 2 billion tickets a year at $500 each. There are over 300 million people in the US. Half are children and the elderly. So how many idiots do it take to repeatedly buy a $500 lottery ticket to soak up 2 billion tickets a year?

      If every single adult buys, then he has to buy 12 tickets/year (2 billion tickets/150 million people), costing him $6000 a year or $500/ month (1 ticket/month) or $25/business day. My commute right now is $5/day.

  3. Tony Alvarado

    February 20, 2014 at 9:03 pm

    I’d like to know what others think of projects similar to the Hyperloop such as the BiModal Glideway Dual Mode Transportation System (for more information on the BiModal Glideway visit the website bimodalglideway.com)? What do you think are the 3 biggest issues facing our U.S. transportation programs and which of these two schemes do you think would best relieve those issues Hyperloop or BiModal Glideway?