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Best Earth Changers

Seafood for the future

Seafood for the Future, the Aquarium of the Pacific’s sustainable seafood program

The brain: Melissa Carrasquillo, program director at the Long Beach aquarium. Do something! Area markets, distributors, and restaurants consult with Seafood for the Future to ensure that their fish is responsibly caught or farmed. Working with the aquarium’s marine biologists, Carrasquillo traces seafood to specific boats and fishermen. The converts: Santa Monica Seafood, McCall’s Meat & Fish Co., Providence, and Lucques are among the spots that tout this program as a resource. Bonus points: At partner restaurants like Parker’s Lighthouse, in Long Beach, order a dish marked with the program’s logo and you’ll receive a free aquarium ticket.

 

 

 

Future

Further, a line of soaps, lotions, and candles made from glycerin, the by-product of biofuel manufacture

The brain: Marshall Dostall, who works from his Pasadena garage. Do something! Dostal was picking up vegetable oil from restaurants—among them Mozza and Tavern—as the source of his biofuel. The leftover glycerin was piling up. He thought: Isn’t glycerin a key ingredient in soap? Hippie dipping: The company’s name comes from the inscription on Ken Kesey’s psychedelic bus. The converts: The soap is in the rest rooms at Mozza, Tavern, Comme Ça, and the Fairmont Hotel. Further products are sold at the Fairmont gift shop, Mozza2Go, Fred Segal, and the Beverly Hills Williams-Sonoma. Smell of success: The scent hints of bergamot, olives, and grass.

 

 

 

Krisers

Kriser’s, a natural pet products store and grooming salon

The brain: Brad Kriser, owner of the Studio City outpost of the Chicago-based company. Do something! The salon uses shampoos, conditioners, and flea repellents that contain only natural ingredients. Who knew? The store carries such novelties as a canine version of Bach’s Rescue Remedy, Bite O’ Blue blueberry treats (from a Maine farm run on wind energy),and the 100 percent biodegradable Poop Bags.

 

 

 

Entropy

Entropy, maker of plant-based resins—the first resin certified in the USDA biopreferred program

The brains: Rey and Desi Banatao, who earned advanced degrees in chemical engineering (Rey) and materials science (Desi) and work out of an industrial space in Gardena. Do something! The brothers wanted to make a living from their passion for action sports. It’s all Greek: The company name comes from the Greek word for “transformation.” The converts: German ski manufacturer Völkl, the all-green Utah company Niche Snowboards, and Hawthorne surf and paddleboard maker Eco Boardworks. Entropy now sells small-batch lots to crafters. Aloha: Warm response has come from Hawaii, where the product is prized among outrigger aficionados.
 

 

 

KellyGreen home

KellyGreen Home, a gift store for the environmentally conscious

The brain: Kelly Van Patter, who opened the Silver Lake boutique after witnessing the devastation of natural habitats in Thailand, Africa, and Indonesia while working as a production designer on Survivor. Do something! The shop offers such earth-friendly products as reusable glass water bottles, recycled metal jewelry, LED task and pendant lights, cork place mats with lacy botanical designs, puppets created from recycled sweaters, and rocking ponies and midcentury dining chairs made of bamboo. The converts: Van Patter has a host of clients for whom she consults on sustainable home design. The word: “Every dollar you spend,” she says, “is a vote for or against the earth.